Skip to Content
National Politics

Liz Cheney expected to lose House Republican leadership post over feud with Republicans, Trump

Rep. Liz Cheney is expected to lose her post in the House Republican leadership on Wednesday after publicly rejecting for months former President Donald Trump’s lie that he won the 2020 presidential election.

House Republicans are instead likely to replace her with New York Rep. Elise Stefanik, who has a less conservative voting record than Cheney but has emerged as one of Trump’s top defenders. Cheney defended herself in a speech on Tuesday evening.

“We must speak the truth,” Cheney said. “Our election was not stolen. And America has not failed.”

Cheney defended her previous remarks as well as her conservative credentials amid criticism from Trump’s allies in her conference who refused to accept the outcome of the election.

“I am a conservative Republican, and the most conservative of conservative principles is reverence for the rule of law,” she said. “The election is over. That is the rule of law. That is our constitutional process. Those who refuse to accept the rulings of our courts are at war with the Constitution.”

Despite her feud with Trump, House Republicans overwhelmingly voted in early February to keep Cheney as the No. 3 House Republican.

Unlike during the February vote when she worked behind the scenes to fend off the push for her ouster, a senior GOP member of Congress who supported Cheney then told CNN he had not heard from her ahead of Wednesday’s vote, underscoring the fact that Cheney has not been whipping her colleagues to stay in the position.

A few weeks after the February vote, her renunciation of Trump drew a stark contrast with House Republican leader Kevin McCarthy, who had traveled to Trump’s Mar-a-Lago resort after saying that Trump bore responsibility for the attack on the Capitol in January, and supporting Cheney in her leadership vote in February.

When asked by a reporter if Trump should speak at the Conservative Political Action Conference, McCarthy said “yes,” while Cheney said, “I don’t believe that he should be playing a role in the future of the party or the country.”

McCarthy then ended his appearances at press events with Cheney, raised questions about the election and distanced himself from her attacks.

Cheney’s remarks last week seemed to be McCarthy’s last straw. After Trump attempted to rebrand his loss as “THE BIG LIE!,” the Wyoming Republican noted that the 2020 election “was not stolen” and tweeted that “anyone who claims it was is spreading THE BIG LIE, turning their back on the rule of law, and poisoning our democratic system.”

Well aware that the other members of the House GOP leadership are men, Trump, McCarthy, House GOP Whip Steve Scalise and others quickly backed Stefanik, who has worked to elect more Republican women in Congress.

“Everyone in leadership serves at the pleasure of the conference,” McCarthy said on Fox News last weekend. “We want to be united in moving forward.”

When asked Tuesday if Cheney pushed back too much on Trump, Scalise argued it wasn’t about Cheney’s comments on the former President specifically, but rather how her comments detracted from Republicans’ larger message.

“It’s not about right or wrong, it’s about the focus of our conference, and focusing on pushing back on the agenda that’s being pushed by the Biden administration,” Scalise said Tuesday.

Stefanik’s approval of Trump has increased along with her upstate New York district, which supported Barack Obama in 2012 but went for Trump in 2016 and 2020. In 2016, the congresswoman backed Trump as the party’s presidential nominee, but occasionally criticized him and wouldn’t say his name when asked who she’d support.

Early in the Trump presidency, she aligned herself with then-House Speaker Paul Ryan and focused on her work on the Armed Services and Intelligence committees. She also broke with Trump on some key priorities, including his decision to withdraw the US from the Paris climate accord and the 2017 GOP tax bill.

But when House Democrats moved to impeach Trump for the first time in 2019, Stefanik emerged as one of the President’s most outspoken defenders. She earned Trump’s praise in the process; the President called her “a new Republican star.”

In January, Stefanik objected to certifying Joe Biden’s election, and supported a Texas lawsuit that sought to overturn the results of it in battleground states Trump lost. The Supreme Court rejected the lawsuit, saying Texas lacked standing to throw out the results in other states.

Stefanik has continued to cast doubt on Biden’s victory, saying last week that she “fully” supports a controversial Republican-led audit in Arizona, where Biden narrowly won.

There is no evidence of widespread voter fraud in the 2020 election. But some House Republicans who supported Cheney in February have said her continued rejection of Trump’s false claims have fractured the party’s message as it seeks to win back the House in 2022.

Even before Monday’s vote, Cheney had been looking beyond her expulsion from House GOP leadership to the next steps of her plan to fight for the future of the Republican Party, enlisting the help from alumni of the Bush administration and other conservatives who have already spoken out against Trump.

Three people familiar with these conversations tell CNN that Cheney has become more actively engaged with Republicans outside of the House conference in recent days, talking and strategizing with these allies about her path forward. The first piece of the plan came in her pointed speech on the House floor last night, which one friend describes “as a model for her path forward.”

In the coming days, the next steps of the plan will become clear, including an effort to “rally the voices of Republicans who share her view,” another GOP confidante says. Cheney intends to make clear that she is has “no intentions of abandoning the Republican Party.”

CNN Newsource

Comments

Leave a Reply

Skip to content